CSRDA Discussion Paper Series

No. 26 Empirical Analysis of the Intention to Quit of Japanese Care Workers: Effect of Gender and Tenure Years
Yoshimasa Kato
Long-term care serviceEmployee genderEmployee tenureJob satisfactionTurnover intention
Goal 5: Gender EqualityGoal 7: Affordable and Clean EnergyGoal 17: Partnerships for the Goals
Fact-Finding Survey on Long-term Care Work, 2017

In this study, I examine the factors affecting care workers’ decision to remain in their current positions in Japanese long-term care facilities. In particular, I analyze the different factors affecting male and female workers and the factors affecting long-term employees (three years or more) versus newly hired employees (less than three years). I use individual data on Japanese long-term care workers to conduct a logit estimation, using workers’ intention to remain in their current role as the dependent variable. Independent variables include a job satisfaction component, as indicated by current employees. The results show that joyful satisfaction has the largest effect on employee decision-making. However, other influential factors differ according to gender and employee tenure. Male care workers tend to place higher importance on their wage, and female care workers place higher importance on managerial assessment of their skills. Employees with longer tenure tend to place higher importance on company location and environment, as well as education and training opportunities, while employees with shorter tenure tend to place higher importance on managerial assessment of their skills. Therefore, consideration is required to the care of employees based on gender and tenure to prevent turnover of employees.